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NF Fact of the Day May 13th

Louise CunninghamNF2 affects about 1 in 25,000 people. Approximately 50 percent of affected people inherit the disorder; in others the disorder is caused by a spontaneous genetic mutation of unknown cause. The hallmark finding in NF2 is the presence of slow-growing tumors on the eighth cranial nerves. These nerves have two branches: the acoustic branch helps people hear by transmitting sound sensations to the brain; and the vestibular branch helps people maintain their balance. The characteristic tumors of NF2 are called vestibular schwannomas because of their location and the types of cells involved. As these tumors grow, they may press against and damage nearby structures such as other cranial nerves and the brain stem, the latter which can cause serious disability. Schwannomas in NF2 may occur along any nerve in the body, including the spinal nerves, other cranial nerves, and peripheral nerves in the body. These tumors may be seen as bumps under the skin (when the nerves involved are just under the skin surface) or can also be seen on the skin surface as small (less than 1 inch), dark, rough areas of hairy skin. In children, tumors may be smoother, less pigmented, and less hairy.

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NF Fact of the Day May 12th

Treatments for other conditions associated with NF1 are aimed at controlling or relieving symptoms.  Headache and seizures are treated with medications.  Since children with NF1 have a higher than average risk for learning disabilities, they should undergo a detailed neurological exam before they enter school.  Once these children are in school, teachers or parents who suspect there is evidence of one or more learning disabilities should request an evaluation that includes an IQ test and the standard range of tests to evaluate verbal and spatial skills.

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NF Fact of the Day May 11th

Reggie at the Houston Roller DerbyScientists don’t know how to prevent neurofibromas from growing.  Surgery is often recommended to remove tumors that become symptomatic and may become cancerous, as well as for tumors that cause significant cosmetic disfigurement.  Several surgical options exist, but there is no general agreement among doctors about when surgery should be performed or which surgical option is best.  Individuals considering surgery should carefully weigh the risks and benefits of all their options to determine which treatment is right for them.  Treatment for neurofibromas that become malignant may include surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy.  Surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy may also be used to control or reduce the size of optic nerve gliomas when vision is threatened.  Some bone malformations, such as scoliosis, can be corrected surgically.

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NF Fact of the Day May 10th

Reggie and Bob Costas at the JW Marriot Hotel in Houston.NF1 is a progressive disorder, which means most symptoms will worsen over time, although a small number of people may have symptoms that remain constant.  It isn’t possible to predict the course of an individual’s disorder.  In general, most people with NF1 will develop mild to moderate symptoms.  Most people with NF1 have a normal life expectancy.  Neurofibromas on or under the skin can increase with age and cause cosmetic and psychological issues.

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NF Fact of the Day May 9th

Washington DC 2010 NF CoalitionSymptoms, particularly the most common skin abnormalities-café-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, Lisch nodules, and freckling in the armpit and groin-are often evident at birth or shortly afterwards, and almost always by the time a child is 10 years old. Because many features of these disorders are age dependent, a definitive diagnosis may take several years.